Nonprofit Newswire | December 29, 2009

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Newswire will return on January 4, 2010.

The Nonprofit QuarterlyDoes a Larger Nonprofit Sector Ward Off Big Government?
Dec 24, 2009; Union Leader | I won’t comment on this article wherein the inimitable Lew Feldstein of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation advances the theory that N.H.’s large (per capita) nonprofit sector makes it more possible to keep government relatively small but it’s an interesting position on which we’d love to get your feedback. New Hampshire’s state motto is, of course, “Live Free or Die.” Local culture comes through loud and clear in the article and the comments that follow.—Ruth McCambridge

The Nonprofit QuarterlyDonated Space a Boon During Scarcity
Dec 14; Richmond Times-Dispatch | This article from Richmond, Virginia discusses the savings that a number of groups have been able to realize through negotiating for free space. It is an option that many rent-paying groups should consider as organizations of all types downsize and may have open space available. Donated space carries its own risks for spontaneous eviction and sometimes a hefty price in upkeep and other attendant costs so it is important to keep eyes open even in these types of negotiations.—Ruth McCambridge

The Nonprofit Quarterly2010 Prognostications
Dec 28, 2009; Mille Lacs Messenger
| Jon Pratt of the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits says that the level of contributions in the fourth quarter of 2009 may seal the fate of a number of nonprofits since that is the quarter when a disproportionate number of charitable donations are generally taken in. MNCN’s “current conditions” report mirrors what we have been hearing from elsewhere. Pratt says that smaller organizations with budgets under $400,000 seem to be suffering more difficulties proportionately to the rest.—Ruth McCambridge


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  • Karrissa Thayer

    I have always had a theory that the reason why government programs are created was because private sector has not stepped in to fill the void. Government usually steps in as a reaction to something.

    However, I had been unable to find research to prove this. This article could be a good starting ground.