Nonprofit Newswire | Nonprofits Take Lead to Keep Money out of Politics

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January 27, 2010; OMB Watch | Nonprofits are taking the lead in ensuring that the voices of ordinary Americans are not diminished by an influx of corporate money into electoral politics. On Jan. 21, the High Court announced its opinion reversing a long held provision that prohibited corporations from using money from their general treasuries to pay for their own campaign-related advertisement. People for the American Way, Common Cause, Alliance for Justice, Organizing for America, OMB Watch, and the Hudson Institute all have stepped forward in significant ways to stem the damage the Court’s opinion brings to our democracy. A coalition of nonprofit organizations that engage in public policy advocacy, including OMB Watch, is seeking to ease restrictions on nonprofit lobbyists in the wake of Citizens United. The organizations sent a joint letter to President Obama addressing their concerns. “The solution [as it relates to lobbying and ethics reform] should focus on issues like campaign finance reform and the disproportionate influence that large financial interests have over our nation’s politics and public policies. The Supreme Court’s decision in Citizens United v. FEC has increased the urgency of such actions,” said the organizations.—Aaron Lester