Nonprofit Newswire | Post-Stimulus Hangover

Print Share on LinkedIn More
Subscribe via E-Mail Get the newswire delivered to you – free! {source} [[form name=”ccoptin” action=”http://visitor.constantcontact.com/d.jsp” target=”_blank” method=”post”]] [[input type=”text” name=”ea” size=”20″ value=”” style=”font-family:Verdana,Geneva,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size:10px; border:1px solid #999999;”]] [[input type=”submit” name=”go” value=”GO” class=”submit” style=”font-family:Verdana,Arial,Helvetica,sans-serif; font-size:10px;”]] [[input type=”hidden” name=”m” value=”1101451017273″]] [[input type=”hidden” name=”p” value=”oi”]] [[/form]] {/source} Subscribe via RSS Subscribe via RSS Submit a News Item Submit a News Item

February 21, 2010; Times News | Is anyone looking out for what nonprofits are going to do when there’s no more stimulus money—but still federal spending cuts and state deficits galore? The impact of the stimulus for nonprofits in Henderson County, North Carolina is pretty clear. The Times-News reports that Western Carolina Community Action got $3 million for Head Start and Early Head start programs (also serving Transylvania and Polk Counties), Community Services Block Grant (CSBG) funds for housing self-sufficiency services, and addition programs for updating medical data software and for green housing development.  ‘The Carolina Mountain Land Conservancy received money for promoting weatherization and energy efficiency (again, serving more than just Henderson County). Not surprisingly, a community health center also received money: Blue Ridge Community Health Services got $1 million for hiring a medical team and expanding its services to people without medical insurance (part of the grant dollars also went for capital improvements). The Boys and Girls Club of Henderson County received money to help it save three positions that would have otherwise been lost. So what happens to the new medical team at the health center when stimulus funds aren’t there for salaries? What happens at the Boys and Girls Club after the year’s funding for saving the three staff ends? And what happens to the new Head Start outreach at WCCA? As much as the stimulus staved off some big hardships for many nonprofits, the post-stimulus funding picture is going to leave many nonprofits on the brink. If the nation is serious about the economy, saving the nonprofit part of the economy should be part of the equation going into FY2011 and beyond.—Rick Cohen

  • Blaire McPherson

    I’ve helped write Recovery Act-funded grants for five agencies, three of which featured extremely bloated budgets. Writing those sustainability sections may have launched my fiction career.
    I’m concerned about this problem, too. Anyone have solutions?
    Maybe…”Think small, and live to fight another day.”