Post-Election Nonprofit Agenda? 47 Million Americans in Poverty

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October 26, 2012; Source: Truthout

The nonprofit sector has often functioned as the first line of American response to the needs of the poor. That is true whether one’s notion of nonprofits is as the necessary and valued delivery mechanisms of government social safety net programs or as delivery mechanisms of the decent, compassionate reactions of the American public through charity and volunteerism. But it has been extraordinarily difficult to get this nation’s political leaders to recognize poverty as an issue warranting public discourse and debate.

Maybe the reluctance to speak about poverty stems from the negative characterizations of the poor that have stealthily been accepted by much of the American public as true. Writing for Truthout, Jeff Nall dissects and debunks some of the stereotypes that are, remarkably, widely accepted in our society:

  1. “The Bootstrap Myth” is the notion that if you work hard enough, you won’t be poor, but if you are poor, it means that you “lack the will, integrity or intelligence to succeed.”
  2. There is also the idea that poor people are unemployed. If true, getting people jobs would solve poverty. But the fact is that sizeable proportions of the poor and of people on food stamps do have job earnings, but work in jobs that provide poverty-level wages.
  3. Another myth is that poor people refuse to work, as in the well-known charge from former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney that “the 47 percent,” as paraphrased by Nall, are “demanding government solve all of their problems and provide for their every need.”
  4. Another fallacy is the belief that poverty means that you must be African American, but more than one-third of head-of-households receiving food stamps are white.
  5. Then there is the belief that “education necessarily remedies poverty,” “that a lack of education is the root of poverty, and that education is the answer to poor people’s plight,” which Nall suggests is a “fallacious oversimplification that distorts reality.”

In all of these cases, Nall whacks Republicans ranging from Romney to former House Speaker Newt Gingrich to former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum for perpetuating these myths. He only includes President Barack Obama in one line, as a supporter of the education myth, but in reality, both presidential candidates have gone into reverse gear when it comes to dealing with the poor, either because they might more or less believe in these myths or because they don’t have the political bearings for challenging them.

Politicians of all stripes might disagree on how to address poverty, but nonprofits of all stripes know that they and the nation have to do so. This may be the nonprofit sector’s biggest post-election messaging challenge. It’s not about getting politicians to say what they think of the charitable deduction. It’s not about getting politicians to offer facile “I (heart) nonprofit” bromides. It’s in coming to grips with the poverty that afflicts 47 million Americans.—Rick Cohen

  • Ann in Midwest

    Thank you for this article! I’m white, educated, and have a history of more than 20 years in the workforce. But I’m living near the poverty level and relying on compassionate assistance to pay for vital prescriptions and for housing. The job I’ve found and been able to sustain isn’t enough to cover my basic expenses. (and I’m well aware of the difference between needs and wants, so it’s not that my basic expenses are extravagant.)
    The five myths you reference are indeed thriving right now, and incredibly painful to hear over and over again, especially from individuals who identify themselves as Christians. I hope those who believe the battle against poverty must never end will beef up their efforts to debunk myths and sustain and replicate successful pathways out. It will take many voices to get the newly-elected politicians and their colleagues to address these issues, or I fear we will have to experience the consequences of letting good programs lapse and good people perish. Please, continue to empower your readers to be vocal and active in the quest for a nation with fewer people in poverty.