• The closest connection that I can see between this story and the non-profit sector is more about external than internal influences (but resulting in policies that are internal). That is “the war on overhead” that continues despite efforts to reverse the trend by some of the wrong-headed “charity oversight” organizations that created the problem in the first place. The constant pressure to reduce “administrative” or “non-program” expenses has the same de facto result on employees as these corporate stories. Someone still has to do the work even if nobody wants to see funding allocated to it. Our sector is expected to be PERFECT with respect to accountability and oversight and yet we are to somehow make it happen at no cost, when we all know that owes mainly to the work of paid professionals who are expected to deliver that perfection in addition to their regular full-time jobs so that the “shame” of spending money on the very necessary work of administration, training, banking, finance, communications, etc. is “off the books” and on to the backs of overworked staff.