Nonprofits and Taxes: A Reflection of Your Value Set—Right?

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April 14, 2016; Center for American Progress

On Tax Day, a report released yesterday from the Center for American Progress may help you consider why tax activism is so important to the work of your nonprofit. The following graphics and notes come directly from the content of that piece.


Reducing-Poverty-graphic

Figure 1 represents estimated average one-year revenue loss from not allowing the estate tax cut to return to its level prior to the so-called Bush tax cuts—that is, to its level under 2001 law—versus the estimated one-year costs of President Obama’s EITC proposal for workers without qualifying children and the Center for American Progress’ proposal to strengthen the Child Tax Credit.

 

Reducing-Poverty-graphic2

Figure 2 represents the estimated one-year revenue loss from letting companies defer paying taxes on foreign profits versus the estimated one-year cost of switching from the USDA’s Thrifty Food Plan to the Low-Cost Food Plan in SNAP.

 

Reducing-Poverty-graphic3

Figure 3 represents the estimated one-year revenue loss from the exclusion of capital gains on home sales versus the estimated one-year cost of the Bipartisan Policy Center’s proposal to give rental assistance to everyone whose income is at or below 30 percent of area median income through a reformed voucher program.

 

Reducing-Poverty-graphic4

Figure 4 represents the estimated one-year revenue loss from the step-up in basis for capital gains tax expenditure versus the estimated one-year cost of the Center for American Progress’ child care proposal.


You should look back to the report itself for the details of the proposals referred to here, but please remember: Taxes are levied in your name. The design of these is a reflection of your values. Did you mean to support your local billionaire? Will you do so without a peep of protest next year?—Ruth McCambridge