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February 21, 2010; Washington Post | By their nature, nonprofits aren’t supposed to make a profit, but just because of that they shouldn’t have to suffer losses because people steal their products or services. Take the case of Washington, D.C.’s Busboys and Poets bookshop. Owned by the nonprofit group, Teaching for Change, which promotes social justice in the classroom, the bookstore is frequently the victim of theft. Don Allen, the bookstore’s owner told the Washington Post, “Even though we’re a social justice nonprofit, people still steal books from us.” Where’s the justice in that?—Bruce Trachtenberg