• Mark Bertler

    I’m a little concerned by the article’s promotion of nonprofit status as a silver bullet for best practices as they relate to hospice and palliative care. Other important factors include well trained and appropriately credentialed staff, consistent adherence to science, practice based guidelines and requirements and including hospice and palliative care as part of the treatment continuum. One of those guidelines in hospice and palliative care is requiring the inclusion of the wishes of the family in the treatment plan. In addition, it is important to have tools in place that allow consumers to shop for the care they need. None of these issues are adequately addressed simply by the profit or nonprofit status of the organization

    • Laura H. Chapman

      In addition, it is important to have tools in place that allow consumers to shop for the care they need.

      A patient in need of hospice care is not well poised to “shop” for care. There are also moral/ethical questions in profiteering from people who might be presumed to have adopted the principle of do no harm. OF course non-profits can actually be profit centers for the administrators and the providers of care.