• It would be seriously destabilizing to the American economy to take on Puerto Rico as a state, given the condition of it’s nearly bankrupt and badly mismanaged socialist skewed economy. That and it would really screw up the US flag.

    • Jose A. Diaz

      What’s so socialist about our economy? The fact that, annually, we receive $4.6B in federal aid while we pay $22.6B in import traiffs, $1.5B to use the US Merchant Marine because by law we cannot use cheaper shipping lines, and your corporations take out $34B in profits from our pockets to the Mainland instead of investing them on the island? Really? However, don’t worry — we don’t want to screw up your flag either.

  • elConsciente

    The U.S. economy is already hit by Puerto Rico’s billion dollar debt default. Let Puerto Ricans on the island decide and we on the mainland must respect their decision.

    • Jose A. Diaz

      Your recommendation is sensible and fair, but oblivious. You gotta learn a little more about Puerto Rico’s political history before making a suggestion like that.

      Puerto Ricans already decided in 1967, 1993, 1998 and 2012 that they do not want Statehood, but rather, they want to keep the Commonwealth and fix it, not “nix” it. The will of the people in all those plebiscites mandated Washington and San Juan to sit down and REVISE the Commonwealth relationship (which has not been touched in 65 years), UPGRADE it through positive changes that fit the new millennium and RENEGOTIATE it so the Commonwealth can develop a prosperous economy that allows them to pay their debts and help their people and depend LESS from Washington.

      The last three plebiscites (1993, 1998 and 2012) were organized and designed by pro-Statehood thugs who want to shove Statehood down the throats of 56% who don’t want it. Sunday’s plebiscite will be the fifth time they hold a plebiscite, and it will be non-binding because the Department of Justice did not approve the misleading ballot that didn’t even include the Commonwealth option that always wins plebiscites.

      How many more plebiscites are needed in a democracy so that governments respect the will of the people?

      • elConsciente

        The problem is that the 2012 plebiscite was boycotted by Commonwealth supporters giving the illusion to those of us outside the US that the majority of Puerto Ricans support statehood. In this 2017 plebiscite happening as I type the anti-statehood forces supporting the current status quo, independence, and free association chose once again to boycott the referendum. So what gives? You guys need to unite and vote or else statehood will win yet again.

  • UPDATE: Puerto Rico’s referendum/plebiscite results are in: overwhelming support for statehood, almost no support for either independence or the status quo (remain a U.S. territory). The problem? Turnout was only 23 percent. See: http://thehill.com/homenews/news/337347-puerto-rico-votes-in-favor-of-statehood